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England Muddles Through Harold Scarborough

England Muddles Through

Harold Scarborough

Published March 1st 2007
ISBN : 9781406701784
Paperback
284 pages
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 About the Book 

ENGLAND MODULES THROUGH BY HAROLD E. SCARBOROUGH NEW YORK THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1932 AUTHORS NOTE FOR some centuries British writers have asserted that no foreigner ever has quite succeeded in understanding their countrymen. This is largely a matterMoreENGLAND MODULES THROUGH BY HAROLD E. SCARBOROUGH NEW YORK THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1932 AUTHORS NOTE FOR some centuries British writers have asserted that no foreigner ever has quite succeeded in understanding their countrymen. This is largely a matter of definition. Such understanding as may have been achieved by outsiders may not, to the native, have seemed to com prise understanding at all. Yet since the time of Julius Caesar men of other nations have obstinately persisted in recording their impressions of the inhabitants of these islands, and it is highly probable, if perhaps deplorable, that the process will continue. The present author lays no claim to any extravagant measure of perception. On the other hand, his residence of rather more than eleven years in England as the correspondent of a great American newspaper presupposes a certain familiarity with, and perhaps even comprehension of, his subject. Because so many of the opinions hereinafter to be expressed have been formed through personal investigation and contact, rather than gleaned from other writers on the same subject, no formal bibliography is appended individual quotations only are acknowledged. Obviously the classification of people by nationality is a far from ideal method. Nothing is easier than to point out individuals who appear to personify the negation of any or every quality commonly ascribed to their countrymen. Yet perhaps the denominator of common citizenship is as high a one as can be applied it has, at least, the advantage of being generally accepted. Everyone, noted Henry Adams in his Education must bear his own universe, and most persons are moderately interested in learning how their neighbors havemanaged to carry theirs. This volume constitutes an effort to give some idea how the English man attempts his task. But when the average Englishman is hereafter mentioned in these pages, let no one think the author so fatuous as to believe that he has succeeded in applying a common measure to a highly individualistic race. The Englishman must remain a hypothetical figure. Perhaps, for all that, he does not wholly lack reality for reality in England is often improbable and seldom logical H. E. S. ENGLAND MUDDLES THROUGH CHAPTER I WITHIN the maturity of people who are only now in middle age, there has been wrought in England a change as fundamental, and possibly as far-reaching, as those entailed by the Black Death or the Industrial Revolution. We are still too close to the event to be able to do more than note its initial manifestations. Yet, even with the limited perspective of the early years of the second post-war decade, these can be traced with some confidence. The changes brought by the war and its aftermath not only affect every superficial phase of English life, but have even permeated the basic philosophy of the nation and altered the very face of the land itself. Those of us who studied history before 1914 learned about an England which no longer exists, either materially or spiritually. However, although there has been universal alteration, there has been comparatively little obliteration so that the activities and institutions of Englishmen are more than ever marked by apparent contradictions and irrelevancies. Since in historical spacer-time 1914 is much farther away from 1932 than it is on the calendar, it would perhaps be advisable briefly to recapitulate some salient z 2ENGLAND MUDDLES THROUGH features of that earlier period, while avoiding, if possible, the now prevalent tendency to idealize it. Although the long Victorian era of unparalleled prosperity and political stability was over the country was still, to a great extent, carried on the momentum of that earlier period. The structure of the State seemed thoroughly stratified. A comparatively small class was firmly in possession of the government and of most of the countrys land and capital...