Home » Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records: Relative to the History of the City of Exeter by William Cotton
Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records: Relative to the History of the City of Exeter William Cotton

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records: Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

William Cotton

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331414292
Paperback
262 pages
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Excerpt from Gleanings From the Municipal and Cathedral Records: Relative to the History of the City of ExeterIn the choir of the south aisle of the Cathedral Church of Exeter, in recesses in the wall, are the recumbent effigies of two knights,MoreExcerpt from Gleanings From the Municipal and Cathedral Records: Relative to the History of the City of ExeterIn the choir of the south aisle of the Cathedral Church of Exeter, in recesses in the wall, are the recumbent effigies of two knights, cross-legged and armed cap-a-pie, their feet resting on lions. The one lying farthest eastward was doubtless erected by the second Countess of Devon to the memory of her father, Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, and the Cathedral being the burying place of the Courtenays, its presence here is intelligible. With this monument we have no particular concern, although it has an interesting history of its own. The other I propose to identify as being connected with an old story, the main features of which are still preserved to us, notwithstanding the great lapse of time. Britton in his Cathedral Antiquities says that this effigy commemorates a knight of the Chichester family, called Sir Arthur, the Bishops brother. Mr. King in his hand-book to the Cathedral, assigns it to a knight of the Chichester family. Jenkins writes that it was, according to tradition, erected to the memory of Ralegh de Ralegh- and Meyrick remarks, with an authority which cannot be questioned, that the effigy is of the time of Edward the First, and, further, that the flattened coiffe is said to have borne on the shield the arms of Ralegh, viz: - Gules a bend vaire, between six crosslets, or. Before all trace was obliterated these arms were seen and noted, and because they are borne by the Chichesters it was thought that the buried knight must have belonged to that family.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.