Home » Correction Officers Guide to Understanding Inmates: The 44 Keys to Power, Control, and Respect (Volume 1) by Larone Koonce
Correction Officers Guide to Understanding Inmates: The 44 Keys to Power, Control, and Respect (Volume 1) Larone Koonce

Correction Officers Guide to Understanding Inmates: The 44 Keys to Power, Control, and Respect (Volume 1)

Larone Koonce

Published
ISBN :
Paperback
232 pages
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 About the Book 

Larone Koonce is a retired New York City Correction Officer with nearly 20 years of experience supervising New Yorks most notorious inmates. If you are a correction officer, prison guard or if you are just interested in the field of corrections thenMoreLarone Koonce is a retired New York City Correction Officer with nearly 20 years of experience supervising New Yorks most notorious inmates. If you are a correction officer, prison guard or if you are just interested in the field of corrections then this is the book for you. The Correction Officer’s Guide to Understanding Inmates: The 44 Keys to Power, Control, and Respect helps the reader understand what it means to be a correction officer and how experienced correction officers and prison guards control inmate behaviors. It gives real life examples of the common situations that today’s correction officers face and offers tried and true methods of handling these situations. Expand your understanding of corrections and inmates by taking advantage of the information that has been compiled in this book. By reading this book you will gain knowledge of the job of corrections that may take many years to acquire. This information is only passed down from one experienced officer to the next. You will not find this information in any other book. It will help you avoid many of the pitfalls of the job. After reading this book you will know the way of corrections. It will become crystal clear what you need to do to become a successful correction officer. If you are on the right track it will confirm what you already know. If you are having difficulties it will give you the tools you need to refocus and be a more effective officer. There are 44 different sections or “Keys” in this book. Each one will add to your skill set and understanding. I’m sure you will find subjects that interest you. You will be familiar with some of the information in these sections, and some of the information will be new to you, but all the sections contain things you need to know. All the information is useful and vital to your success. This is a book that you want to have on your bookshelf or in your locker at work! The goal of this book is to help you have a safe and successful career in corrections. If you are a correction officer, read this book and pass it on to someone else whom you think may benefit from the information. If you are not a correction officer but know someone who is, get this book into his or her hands. It will prove to be one of the best things you can do for them. Good luck and be safe. This book should be required reading in every correctional academy. The advice is priceless- it will save the jobs and mental health of many recruit officers. While experience cannot be taught- it can save many from the pitfalls of the job. Dr. Ali-al-Rahman Assistant Professor Criminal Justice Department Nassau Community College (Retired NYC DOC Warden) The context of the guide is not to provide a total text of everything one needs to know in understanding inmates, but instead is a functional look of serious pitfalls to avoid when becoming a correction officer and supervising inmates. The book, “Correction Officer’s Guide to Understanding Inmates” is written in a manner that flows evenly from beginning to end, the book is a personal accounting of what an average person might encounter in becoming a correction officer. Although set within the New York City Department of Correction, the guide is a testimonial for any correction officer, anywhere. Clear and un-apologizing advice is given from a person that has acquired a high level of understanding inmates and professional skill in dealing with them. A new correction officer would find the guide a revealing resource of suggestions that are only considered by many tenured staff members once they have made mistakes. The guide is a means to avoid such mistakes. “Correction Officer’s Guide to Understanding Inmates” is a necessary premier for those seeking a career as a correction officer. I highly recommend the guide. Stephen A. Ricci, Esq. (Retired NYC DOC Captain)